Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Qwant Search Engine


Qwant is a French company providing an eponymous web search engine available since 2013. It claims not to use user tracking nor filter bubble to provide search results.


The service initially launched on 16 February 2013, as a beta version, with a stable version released on 4 July 2013. A new version was made available in April 2015.

Qwant Lite


http://www.qwant.com

Onion Web links

DuckDuckGo


http://3g2upl4pq6kufc4m.onion/

TORCH : Tor Search !


http://xmh57jrzrnw6insl.onion/

Onion anonymity


http://32rfckwuorlf4dlv.onion/

not Evil


http://hss3uro2hsxfogfq.onion/

Note :

To browse .onion Deep Web links, you need Tor from https://www.torproject.org

Friday, February 26, 2016

Submit Url to Beamed


To submit an URL to Beamed

http://beamed.com/search/index.php?p=2

Search Alliance Global Algo Transition Update (Article from Kartik Ramakrishnan)

It is with great pleasure I’d like to share that Yahoo! has completed the algorithmic transition to Bing in all global markets (except Korea), across desktop and mobile, for all Yahoo! and syndication traffic. This has been a huge effort spanning 20-plus months involving many people across Yahoo! and Microsoft. Only Korea, which involves a three-way integration between Yahoo, Microsoft and Daum, remains, and is expected to complete by the end of the year.


I often get asked what makes the algo transition effort so complex. Here are some of the interesting challenges we’ve had to deal with to provide some color to the effort:

We had to cutover web, image and video search experiences from Yahoo!’s search technology backend to Bing’s algorithmic backend for 40-plus markets, across desktop and mobile devices.

In addition to Yahoo’s owned and operated search experiences, we also had to cut over hundreds of our syndication partners in more than 50 markets, while ensuring a smooth transition for users of our wildly popular Yahoo! Search BOSS service.

Cutting over to the Bing backend was not simply a matter of technical integration through the Bing API. We worked with Microsoft to ensure that Bing’s algorithmic quality in each of these markets was on par or better than Yahoo!’s quality. Wherever we found quality gaps, we worked collaboratively with our counterparts at Bing to provide data driven assessments of quality gaps to help us close the gaps quickly. Only when both teams had established that the quality bar in a market was met, did we green light the cutover.

A very important design principle was to ensure availability of all key user experience elements of the Yahoo! search experience post-cutover. This meant that we had to perform a comprehensive analysis of product features per market, assess which of those would require support from the Bing platform, and which features Yahoo! would have to continue to develop and invest in.

Creating a migration path to Bing Webmaster tools for users of Yahoo! Site Explorer, while continuing to support Site Explorer for international users during the transition period proved challenging.

We had to confirm Bing could handle Yahoo’s capacity across multiple global datacenters, including new ones that were brought online to serve the needs of the Search Alliance. The fact that all the cutovers went remarkably smoothly and were essentially non-events from an operational perspective is a testament to the thorough job both teams did.

For all our major markets, we ran comprehensive bucket tests to compare the Yahoo! search experience going against the Yahoo! and Bing backends. We monitored key user experience metrics to ensure that the product experience post cutover would be on par or better for our customers.
We had to put in place support and customer care processes that ensured user concerns and content issues were handled appropriately between our companies, working through policy differences to ensure the right outcome for all stakeholders.

For those of us who have been deeply involved in the algo transition, this has easily been one of the best learning experiences of our professional lives. All the late nights, war room huddles, SeaTac trips and time away from families, all of the technical deep dives, business negotiations, ‘pausing & unpausing’ ;-), have all been worth it. I am extraordinarily privileged to have worked with an exceptional group of people, both within Yahoo! and Microsoft — you all know who you are. Thank you so much for your dedication and commitment to delivering the best possible search experience for our users.

– Kartik Ramakrishnan, VP of Search Engineering, Yahoo!
http://www.ysearchblog.com/2011/10/18/search-alliance-global-algo-transition-update/

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Submit Url to Boxwind


To submit an URL to Boxwind

http://www.boxwind.com/submit-site-url

Boxwind Search :

http://www.boxwind.com

Boxwind Advanced Search :

http://www.boxwind.com/advanced_search

Saturday, May 9, 2015

Submit Url to Seznam

Seznam

To submit an URL to Seznam

http://search.seznam.cz/pridej-stranku

Seznam User Agent :

User-agent: seznambot

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Submit Url to MajorGo



To submit an URL to MajorGo

http://majorgo.com/cgi-bin/links/add.cgi?ID=1

Note from Add-url.fr :

This website has been discontinued.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Submit Url to W3 Directory



To submit an URL to W3 Directory

http://www.w3-directory.com/Add-a-web-site.php

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Submit Url to Archive-com

 Archive-com

To submit an URL to Archive-com

http://archive-com.com/form_submit_your_site_to_archive

Monday, June 2, 2014

Submit Url to BOTID

 BOTID

To submit an URL to BOTID

http://www.botid.org/Add-Site/Add-Site.aspx

Submit Url to Bestyellow

 Bestyellow

To submit an URL to Bestyellow

http://www.bestyellow.com/addurl.html

Submit Url to Websquash

 Websquash

To submit an URL to Websquash

http://www.websquash.com/cgi-bin/search/search.pl?Mode=AnonAdd

Sunday, May 11, 2014

Lycos

Lycos, Inc. is a search engine and web portal established in 1994. Lycos also encompasses a network of email, webhosting, social networking, and entertainment websites.

 Lycos

History

Lycos is a university spin-off that began as a research project by Michael Loren Mauldin of Carnegie Mellon University's main Pittsburgh campus in 1994. Lycos Inc. was formed with approximately US $2 million ($3.2 million today) in venture capital funding from CMGI. Bob Davis became the CEO and first employee of the new company in 1995, and concentrated on building the company into an advertising-supported web portal. Lycos enjoyed several years of growth during the 1990s and became the most visited online destination in the world in 1999, with a global presence in more than 40 countries. In 1996, the company completed the fastest IPO from inception to offering in NASDAQ history. In 1997, it became one of the first profitable internet businesses in the world. In 1998, Lycos paid $58 million ($83.9 million today) for Tripod in an attempt to "break into the portal market." Over the course of the next few years, Lycos acquired nearly two dozen internet brands including Gamesville, WhoWhere, Wired Digital (eventually sold to Wired), Quote.com, Angelfire, Matchmaker.com and Raging Bull.



Lycos Europe was a joint venture between Lycos and the Bertelsmann transnational media corporation, but it has always been a distinct corporate entity. Although Lycos Europe remains the largest of Lycos's overseas ventures, several other companies also entered into joint venture agreements including Lycos Canada, Lycos Korea and Lycos Asia. Near the peak of the internet bubble on May 16, 2000, Lycos announced its intent to be acquired by Terra Networks, the internet arm of the Spanish telecommunications giant Telefónica, for $12.5 billion ($17.7 billion today). The acquisition price represented a return of nearly 3000 times the company's initial venture capital investment and about 20 times its initial public offering valuation. The transaction closed in October 2000 and the merged company was renamed Terra Lycos, although the Lycos brand continued to be used in the United States. Overseas, the company continued to be known as Terra Networks. On August 2, 2004, Terra announced that it was selling Lycos to Seoul, South Korea-based Daum Communications Corporation for $95.4 million in cash ($119.12 million today), less than 2% of Terra's initial multi-billion dollar investment. In October 2004, the transaction closed and the company name was changed back to Lycos Inc. The remaining half of the business owned by Terra was subsequently reacquired by Telefónica. Under new ownership, Lycos began to refocus its strategy. In 2005, the company moved away from a search-centric portal and toward a community destination for broadband entertainment content. With a new management team in place, Lycos also began divesting properties that were not core to its new strategy. In July 2006, Wired News, which had been part of Lycos since the purchase of Wired Digital in 1998, was sold to Condé Nast Publications and re-merged with Wired Magazine. The Lycos Finance division, best known for Quote.com and Raging Bull.com, was sold to FT Interactive Data Corporation in February 2006, while its online dating site, Matchmaker.com, was sold to Date.com. In 2006, Lycos regained ownership of the Lycos trademark from Carnegie Mellon University. During 2006, Lycos introduced several media services, including Lycos Phone which combined video chat, real-time video on demand, and an MP3 player. In August of the same year, a new version of Lycos Mail was released, which allowed sending and receiving large files, including unlimited file attachment sizes. In November 2006, Lycos began to roll out applications centered around social media, including the first "watch and chat" video application with the launch of its Lycos Cinema platform. In February 2007, Lycos MIX was launched, allowing users to pull video clips from YouTube, Google Video, Yahoo! Video and MySpace Video. Lycos MIX also allowed users to create playlists where other users could add video comments and chat in real-time. As part of a corporate restructuring to focus on mobile, social networks and location-based services, Daum sold Lycos for $36 million in August 2010 to Ybrant Digital, an internet marketing company based in Hyderabad, India. In May 2012 Lycos announced the appointment of former employee Rob Balazy as CEO.

HotBot

HotBot is a web search engine currently owned by Lycos. It was launched in May 1996 by Wired magazine. In the 1990s, it was one of the most popular search engines on the World Wide Web.

 Hotbot

History

HotBot became a popular tool with search results served by the Inktomi database and directory results provided originally by LookSmart and then DMOZ since mid-1999. Hotbot also used search data from Direct Hit for a period, which was a tool that used click-through data to manipulate results. It was launched using a "new links" strategy of marketing, claiming to update its search database more often than its competitors. It also offered free webpage hosting, but only for a short time, and it was taken down without any notice to its users. It was one of the first search engines to offer the ability to search within search results.



Acquisition and recession

Lycos acquired HotBot in 1998 and for a number of years HotBot languished with limited development and falling market share. At the end of 2002 HotBot was relaunched as a multiple option search tool, giving users the option to search either the FAST, Google, Inktomi or Teoma databases.

90s style website

Up to 2011, the HotBot website was merely a front end for three third-party search engines (Yahoo.com, MSN, and lyGo.com). The site still had an outdated classic design, and to search with HotBot, one had to click on which search engine of these three to use.

A new beginning

In July 2011, HotBot was relaunched with a new robot-like mascot, a new logo, and a modern site design. In the beta, HotBot became a portal, returning not just web search results, but also searches from various Lycos websites, such as News, Shopping and Weather Zombie. The portal interface lasted for roughly 6 months, and these features were instead reincorporated into the 2012 Lycos website redesign, returning HotBot to a simplified search interface.

Toolbar

In early 2004 Lycos launched a beta release of a free toolbar search product, Lycos HotBot DeskTop, which the company said was "the first product to integrate traditional desktop search with Web search within the browser." The HotBot DeskTop could search the Internet using Inktomi, e-mail folders for Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express, and user documents stored on a hard drive. It also incorporated a blocker for pop-up ads and an RSS News Reader syndication. Indexes created to track e-mail and user files remained stored locally to protect user privacy. Text-based ads were displayed when viewing results for several types of Internet searches. Lycos licensed dtSearch technology to power the local search options.

Submit Url to SearchHippo

 Search Hippo

To submit an URL to SearchHippo

http://www.searchhippo.com/addlink.php

Submit Url to Clickey

To submit an URL to Clickey

http://www.clickey.com/signup.shtml

Submit Url to Hoteltelnet

To submit an URL to Hoteltelnet

http://www.hoteltelnet.hu/fr/add_link/

Monday, December 2, 2013

Submit Url to Sogou

To submit an Url to Sogou

http://help.sogou.com/addurl.html?urlword=

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Support DuckDuckGo

 DuckDuckGo

Help Spread DuckDuckGo!

Please help spread anonymous, better search. Most people find out about us through friends, family or colleagues. What works best is for people to try DuckDuckGo as their default for a few weeks. You can set us in browsers via our homepage (bottom right).

https://www.duckduckgo.com

© DuckDuckGo 2013

Submit an Url to Webwombat

To submit an Url to Webwombat

https://trans.webwombat.com.au